About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 9
MSNBC 3
MSNBCW 3
CNNW 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN2 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the mountains or into the wilderness or out to the seashore, and the great numbers of people in need always followed. tired and drained as he was, he looked on them with compassion. anoint all your people, lord, all those who minister to you as they minister to one another and especially this week as they minister to the body, mind, and spirit, to the whole community of sandy hook and newtown. a model for the nation, a model for the world, and we thank you for the world's support, calling, e-mailing, texting their love and their commitment to be one with us. use them, lord. take the passion that each one has and transform it totally, completely into your spirit of compassion. and we ask this all, amen. amen. >> newtown is a place that loves children above all. families move to newtown because we are a caring and loving community. we are also a place that has great pride in our schools, pride that propels the students in those schools with their outstanding teachers and administrators to high achievement and great personal worth. the horror that was visited upon our sandy hook school was not
boyfriend in the snowy wilderness talks about her ordeal after these messages. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. we're for the individual. the food lover. the movie lover. the road tripper. and the music mentor. ♪ we're for the gamer. the play maker. the page turner. and the up-all-nighters. so when we set out to make a smart phone we didn't make one for all of us. we made one for each of us. new windows phone. reinvented around you. we made one for each of us. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your
found after a week in the wilderness. malnourished and >> we're very happy that she >>pam: the family of a sacramento week, their loved one has been found. kron four's philippe djegal is here now. with more on >> paula lane says she stayed alive by eating the tomatoes she and her boyfriend packed with them. as well as snow. roderick clifton did not live. he died while trying to find help. but paula did survive. and, her family is overwhelmed. >> "we've been through a lot in my family. my nephews, my mom, and we're very happy that she made it." the amoun linda hathaway says its >> tough to keep her composure. she breaks up while talking about the emotional rollercoaster her family's been through the past week, lane. >> "it's been a rough haul waiting all those days it or not." >> she did. >> however, her boyfriend roderick clifton did not. maria clifton says her dad's love for off-roading, may have led to his death. >> "honestly, he probably saw some cool spot where you could see the river or something cool like that and he wanted to go over there and he said, 'hey, i'm gonna try my f
in the wilderness, but last year under leadership of glen murphy, manna from heaven, the company got its act together. one of the few retailers with multiple successful concepts. not unlike limited and urban limited being strong too. we have gap, banana republic and old navy. these brands are being managed well with a focus on stocking stores with merchandise people actually like. i think the stock could have a big multiyear run ahead of it. mickey set it up, then some other guys took over, kind of ran it into the ground. murphy is bringing it back. i am not the only person who has noticed the changes. there was a terrific article in the company about the latest edition of "ad age," like the "wall street journal" of marketing. the title says it all "mind the gap retailer's fashion's brands resurgence. social savvy ads and a bit of good timing help retailer come back into style. i like the trades for ideas. that was a good one. beyond more appealing merchandise, gap is doing a number of things to grow the business. the company has been closing stores in the united states, it's opening new out
rare. >> everybody in the ocean should be respectful that they are in the wilderness. it is also very clear, given the number of people in the ocean and the amount of time we spend there versus the vanishingly number of attacks, it is a very, very small risk. >> here in america, 29 shark attacks last year but zero fatalities. >> reporter: he believes the odds are in his favor. >> i don't know of anyone that's been attacked twice. >> reporter: for today, craig melvin, nbc news. >> here is erica. >>> millions of viewers have watched ina garden effortlessly whip up a dinner party on her show, "the barefoot contessa". she is out with her eighth book and i was lucky enough getting an inside peek at her life at home. >> there is a reason why a dinner party is called entertaining. it is supposed to be like theater. >> reporter: she hasn't always been foolproof in the kitchen. when we were first married, a long time ago, i made some things from a cookbook that was like ground beef and corn casserole, which was not a good dinner. >> sort of like shepherd's pie. >> just dreadful. >> thankfully,
on the wealthy 65% to 31%. republicans, i think they're in the wilderness. they face a changing demographical situation in this country they don't know how to deal with. they've not dealt with women's issues properly and they have ignored immigration reform. it's time for the republicans to take a page out of the "ed show" and let's get to work. i'm joined tonight by congressman jim clyburn of south carolina and also eugene robinson, msnbc political analyst and associate editor and pulitzer prize winning columnist for "washington post" but most of all i can title them both as two distinguished gentlemen from south carolina. gentlemen, good to have you with us tonight. congressman, you first. is the congress -- >> thank you so much. >> is the congress better or worse off with a guy like jim demint? >> well, i wouldn't put it that way, ed. i think that jim is a very principled guy. i never agreed with a single one of his principles, but he's a very principled guy. he is doing what he thinks he needs to do in order to further his cause. he has had some real serious problems with his relationship
to be able to bring the bodies from the wilderness. it's out in the middle of nowhere. >> shepard: somebody took a photo of what appears to be jenni rivera's driver's license found in the wreckage. abc news confirms she was talking with that network about staring in a sitcom. she allegedly won a couple of mexican billboard awards. she sold 15 million records throughout her career. [ music ] >> shepard: tonight her fans and family say they just can't believe this has happened and they're remembering a woman who often sang about her own troubles and setbacks and helped ease the pain of others along the way. trace gallagher in our west coast news hub this afternoon. jenni rivera got a late start on her career, trace. >> reporter: and really never dreamed she would be a star. she had the first of her five children at the age of 16 years old, and she never put out her first album until she was 30 years old, but over the past 13 years, her very honest ballads about her personal trouble including three failed marriages really struck a nerve with her fans. she also sang about mexican culture, the d
of order" and tlc's "breaking amish" have also focused on the wilder side of amish life. >> it a controversial concept, and reality feeds on controversy. it's outrageous. it's mysterious. it's unexpected. >> reporter: the network's website acknowledges most of the show is re-enactments, but according to levi, all the stories are the god's honest truth. linsey davis, abc news, new york. >> hope you caught that last word re-enactment. so you're not actually watching it. but they insist the stories are true. but you're not actually watching it unfold. >> it's reality, it's rob's reality with lebanon levi in your household, isn't it? >> that's what i'm talking about. now we're talking. >> who are you paying for a hit? who are you taking out? >> taking out willis, clearly. he's talking trash about the giants/saints game. >> i would just like an italian sausage, please. did you see the sign? i'm hungry. >>> when we -- when we come back, he's back in "the skinny." >> coming up on "world news now." ♪ >>> willis is back. can you tell? >>> willis is back. can you tell? here we g
plans to turn the land into a marine wilderness area, and as a result, the oyster company and 30 employees are out of work. kevin is the owner of drake's bay and now suing for an injunction to keep his business open. good morning to you, kevin. >> good morning, gretchen. how are you? >> gretchen: doing just fine. thank you for getting up so early. so tell me what you've been doing for all these years, your oyster farm. >> the oyster farm is really kind of a main stay in our community. we produce about a third of the oysters grown in the state of california. we get about 50,000 visitors a year who love this place, been here for over eight decades and the community and our county and san francisco bay area loves ush washington, d.c. >> gretchen: so the interior department wants to shut you down. why? >> well, actually a small handful of folks who are really wilderness activists who care deeply about getting people off the land, i think is the best we can tell, want to give up something to create a humanless landscape and it's a little strange because national sea shore was created
-term unemployment. secondly, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical w
's not afraid to be a voice in the wilderness. and all too often, we don't agree with dennis. but we always understood where his passion comes from. and it comes from his deep faith and the fact that he realy believes in america just as the rest of us do. but on a personal note, dennis has become a good friend of mine. we share a deep conviction about obesity in our nation and ways to conquer it. and who knows, maybe on the outside, we will work together to try to find solutions to that. to steve austria, who just stood at this podium. i got to know steve in the state legislature. while we didn't really work together on bill well, actually went to arizona to watch ohio state win its national championship and it was there that i realy got to know him and his wife on a personal level. it was there he shared with me his dream to one day serve in this congress. i'm so glad he was able to let that dream come true. to my good friend steve latourette. when you come as a special election you don't get this orientation that people get when they come as a class. you get elected and you're thrown on t
the wilderness from coast to coast, in recent decades the u.s. has systematically failed to invest in the modern rail system. i thank president obama for making high-speed rail a priority. instead of developing energy efficient mass transit, we have allowed our rail system to deteriorate. we're not just lagging, we're not even trying to innovate. that's just not the american way. as a resident of knight, i fully understand the value of access to high-speed rail service along the southeast corridor. it is the busiest rail line in the united states, and it is the only amtrak segment that runs an operating surplus. it is making a profit. of all the places in our nation high-speed rail makes most sense along the northeast corridor which features the most congested road, the densest population and the most interconnected cities, and it had the ridership to make a profit for the investment in this rail system. from washington to boston, the amtrak stations are located right in the city centers making them more accessible to business travelers and the airports. the northeast region also has the densest
mag is something that is not needed. try taking a walk in the alaska wilderness and tell a grizzly bear that that the 44 is not needed. the three weapons were shown that this maniac had was a glock,ter , a high-end and a high-end sig sauer. anybody should have those under lock and key. and if they are in a state that has concealed carry, like here in oklahoma we have open carry, which i think is ridiculous. i am a correctional officer at and have been one for 20 years. i don't want a bad guy to know i have a weapon on me. i want to be able to protect the people that are in. whatever in like if i would've been there when gabrielle giffords was shot, it would not have been a little old lady to take the guy down. i would've been one of the first people sending sead his way -- lead his way. guest: thank you for calling. host: a tweet -- guest: i have no idea. if senator mcconnell comes on the show, maybe he will have an answer. host: does it help you as a congressman to have the republican leader from your state in the senate? guest: i don't think it is made any difference of our. ther
their destination into a desert wilderness. some folkings were stranded for a day without food or water. apple has told cnn its working very hard to fix its maps. i think that goes to show it never hurts to have the old handy dandy real physical map in your hand. >> somebody tells you, you make a left turn at this street. >> if you're trying to get into the city and you're amongst the brush, you may have taken a wrong turn somewhere. >>> you may not know her name but she was certainly one of the most influential hispanic women on both sides of the u.s./mexico border. up next, jenni rivera's rise from poverty to superstardom. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to w
'm sure he feels like he's a voice in the wilderness by doing that, but every single week each of us gets this special appeal from emanuel cleaver to be what we should be, stewards much our country and to do it in a way that does not demean our institution and demean each other and to advocate for what we believe, but to do it in a way that is more human and kind. i want to join with my colleagues in thanking him for his leadership, but most of all i want to thank him for the tremendous role model he has been for our institution to try to make our institution a better place in which to serve and to try to make each of us better members of this institution. i yield back, mr. chairman. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. neal, for five minutes. mr. neal: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. neal: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, let me also thank reverend cleaver at his request i can't -- series of social security and spent the better part of two days with him and i got op
's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical workers and our country. so
that we should not be crying out in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not actively choose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to g
thing. both parties benefit by taking turns in the wilderness every now and then. over the past 10 years i have offered hundreds of amendments, privileged resolutions and points of order in this chamber. in fact, the vast majority of these offerings resulted in far more red marks next to members' names than green marks up on the wall above me. but i like to think that we, over time, made a difference and that this institution is better for it. in addition to my own capable staff, both here and in arizona, i want to thank those who staffed this chamber. from the floor staff who answered the leadership on both sides of the aisle, to the clerks, to the stenographers, to the parliamentarians who keep us operating within the rules, to the cloakroom staff who keep us fed and remind us when to vote. i found that there resides in all of these individuals an abiding love and deep respect for this institution. most of all i want to thank my family, my wife, sheryl, ryan, alexis, austin, tanner, and dallen. they have been supportive, patient and long suffering in dealing with a schedule that is any
house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. and the more responsive it will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflect
american ingenuity brought rail service through the wilderness, from coast to coast, in the kit -- recent decades, the u.s. has failed to invest in the modern fail -- modern system. instead of developing energy efficient mass transit, we have allowed our rail systems to deteriorate. we are not just lagging. we are not even trying to innovate. that is not the american way. i fully understand the tremendous value of access to high-speed passenger rail service along the northeast corridor. it is the busiest rail line in the united states and it is the only amtrak segment that runs a surplus. is making a profit. of all of the places in our nation, high-speed rail makes most sense along the northeast corridor, which features the most congested road, the densest population, and it has the writer -- ridership to make a profit. from washington to boston, the amtrak stations are located right in city centers. the north east region also has the densest population in the country. 20% of the nation's entire population lived in just this 2% of our land area and our great country. 70% of all chronicall
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)